18-21 Sept 2019 | Olympia London

Example page (PLEASE DO NOT DELETE)

Example page (PLEASE DO NOT DELETE)

Example page (PLEASE DO NOT DELETE)

Design Fresh

Curated by Barbara Chandler, design editor of Homes & Property at the London Evening Standard, Design Fresh is a celebration of outstanding breakthrough talent scouted at major UK design degree shows as well as at two editions of New Designers, with input from over 200 creative courses.

Thirty designers have been selected to demonstrate how global concerns such as climate change; carbon emissions and waste from our lifestyles and industry can be tackled through design. Each idea brings to light the pressing global issues faced day-to-day as well as the needs of us all as individuals.

From eco-aware concepts to innovative manufacturing processes, revolutionary new materials and sustainable ways of using existing ones, designers have been selected for their explorative and problem solving ideas. Others have been chosen for their originality and expression of beauty, where design seamlessly merges with art.

Design Fresh is a thrilling multidisciplinary showcase of cutting-edge design that aims to spark conversation and encourage subsequent change.

Tom Morgan

Tom Morgan

Tom has a BA in in Furniture Design and Making from Rycotewood School of Furniture in Oxford.

His Digi-Weave shoe cabinet is woven from hand-dyed red oak veneers, backed with a strengthening calico fleece, and hand-cut into strips. The lining is a slubby denim-like fabric, offsetting the timber frame.



Instagram

Arjun Singh Assa

Arjun Singh Assa

Arjun, raised in Kenya, spent four years in his family's timber workshop then studied at Nottingham Trent University. His Weave Chair (with beech frame and nylon cord) combines traditional weaving with the strength and curves of advanced geometry, using minimal materials for maximum sustainability. His Poorman's Pony indoor/outdoor seat celebrates architectural terrazo - the "poorman's marble."


Instagram

Anton Mikkonen

Anton Mikkonen

“I’m from Finland, where I have always been surrounded by nature, with a humble lifestyle that celebrates the simple joys of living. This is at the core of my design practice.” The Udon ash stool has top and legs shaped by a basic CNC machine.






Website Instagram

Colin Wilkes

Colin Wilkes

Colin worked as a builder for 15 years before completing a three-year course in glass blowing at Plymouth College of Art. Now a designer-maker, he combines glass with other materials such as wood and concrete, to make stunning sculptures. "I love the fluidity and versatility of glass and the way it enhances my other materials.”




Website Instagram

Dessislava Ivanova

Dessislava Ivanova

After lengthy research, Dessislava has assembled a hydroponics kit with concrete pots for growing herbs at home in natural sunlight, replacing soil with a nutrient solution.
“I tested the system for three months, and the plants had amazing growth.”





 

Instagram

David Howson

David Howson

David's Oak and Grey Home Office Cabinet in oak veneer is seemingly an elegant sideboard, with ridged front in lacquered tulipwood and leather-lined drawers. However the top swings cleverly outwards to become a working surface, and reveals storage for laptop/papers etc. At the side is storage for a stool.





Instagram

Huw Evans

Huw Evans

“I let my materials lead me,” says designer-maker Huw Evans, a graduate of the University of Plymouth. For his Concertina Collection of furniture and lighting, he has methodically cut hardwoods (ash and cherry) to produce a versatile semi-fluid material that moves in multiple directions, for a chair and lighting. He found that subtle changes in thickness, length and frequency of cuts made a big difference to the material’s flexibility.


Website Instagram 

Benjamin Stanton

Benjamin Stanton

Benjamin’s innovative and sturdy board is made from eight compressed layers of discarded denim bound together with bio-resin, and used for oak shelving and a bedside table. “Furniture should be made sustainably from natural materials and be strong enough to last a lifetime.” Benjamin has also kitted out the 100% Design bar.




Website Instagram

Phat Design

Phat Design

Primitive Forms stools are turned, carved and shaped in solid wood by Christian Cowper and Claudia Surrage of Phat Design. “Craft is a balance between art and industry. All our work is handmade, responding to materials with a light-hearted and playful approach. For us, inspiration is everywhere – we are always curious.

 

Website Instagram

Tristan Hibberd

Tristan Hibberd

Tristan’s Clip Shelving is held together by deceptively simple clips that utilise the natural spring of plywood. They simply click into place on walnut uprights – no need for glue or screws. “Designers should experiment if they are to understand materials,” says Tristan, who is also launching designs with Joined+Jointed at 100% Design.

 

Website Instagram

Milo Tonry-Brown

Milo Tonry-Brown

Reinventing Plastic: Milo-Tonry Brown, a recent graduate of Kingston School of Art, wants to break down the “negative stereotype” of recycled plastic, which he says can be “an amazing material”. He adds: “I am celebrating plastic by using it as a joining method for long-lasting furniture in oak.”

 


Instagram 

Callum Langfield

Callum Langfield

Callum Langfield works with a multitude of materials and techniques, immersing himself in the making process and always experimenting. The screen-printed flat plywood surfaces of his Print Chair are the perfect vehicle for a rich, chaotic, psychedelic pattern that he also created as an art print.

 


Website Instagram

Sophie Coiley

Sophie Coiley

Through her design practice Paradise Paper Studio, Sophie Coiley transforms materials which she says are “overlooked and ordinary rather than luxurious and beautiful”- like the discarded cardboard she works by hand into vessels that resemble marble, granite or oxidised metal.

 





Website Instagram

Finley Osborne

Finley Osborne

Constantly experimenting, Finley Osborne creates designs that “express the nature” of his materials, which include expanding polyurethane foam, silicone, and non-recyclable plastic from a local collection centre. He makes “odd but playful” sculptures, lights, and small pieces of furniture.

 





Website Instagram

Red Mud Project

Red Mud Project

Joris Olde Rikkert, Guillermo Whittembury, Kevin Rouff, and Luis Paco Bockelmann are recent graduates of the Royal College of Art. They turn “red mud” (aka bauxite residue), a by-product of the alumina industry, into handsome ceramic bodies and glazes for dishes, tiles, and architectural components. “Because we should use what's already there to create what is to be."                                                                                                                                                                              

Website

Desmond Lim

Desmond Lim

Desmond’s tables have an uncanny balance. How can their solid maple tops stay level and stable on just two legs? The answer is the clever roll of cast polymer at each table’s base acting as an anchor. “My tables are a dramatic use of materials, with a warm, playful and emotive aesthetic” says the designer.

 




Website Instagram

Francesca Smyth

Francesca Smyth

Francesca’s fabrics were “ethically-sourced“ then “locally made” by herself at Edinburgh College of Art. She travelled to India for three weeks better to learn the skills of hand-crafting textiles. Francesca’s multi-layered collection of many samples includes cotton, wool and silk, with subtle abstract motifs and flashes of foil. Amongst her many techniques are block, screen and digital printing, knitting, collage, laser-cutting, and natural dyeing.        


Website Instagram

Lydia Forman

Lydia Forman

Lydia brings a vibrant modern aesthetic to complex traditional weaving skills, to create cushions, upholstery cloths, sheer hangings, and flatweave rugs in yarns that include cotton, silk and Lurex. Inspiration ranges from the colours of Kew Gardens to the rigid repeating facades of contemporary architecture. A striking focal point at 100% Design is the vintage Ercol sofa and chair with covers in her fabrics.                                    

 

Website Instagram

Saffron Saunderson

Saffron Saunderson

Saffron started out as a fine artist, before deciding to specialise in Printed Textiles for her degree course at Loughborough University. And indeed her designs have a strong painterly quality with bold unfettered brushstrokes and an instinctive feel for colour. She creates complex multi-layered prints on the many different fabrics that bring texture to her work, including linen, cotton satin, and barkcloth.



Instagram

Victoria Enright

Victoria Enright

Vicky created the Kaguya chair (the name is derived from an old Japanese folk story) “to bring sustainable bamboo into the 21st century.” A strong frame of poles supports a slimmer bamboo plywood seat and back. Joints are encased in layers of tough bark cloth sealed with an eco resin.

 

 

 


Instagram

Jacob Monk

Jacob Monk

Jacob is a hand-weaver whose work resembles abstract paintings. He is inspired by the traditional techniques of ikat, first binding and dyeing the wool warp threads, which later creates a vertical sense of movement in the finished cloth. Colours range from bright greens and pinks to purples with touches of black – it’s a fresh and contemporary look.

Website Instagram

Diana Tso

Diana Tso

Every year in the UK, up to half a billion single-use plastic plant pots will end up in landfill. As an alternative to single-use plastic, Diana is collecting drift seaweed (a problem in itself) from the shores of local recreational beaches and using it to make biodegradable plant pots (with built-in fertilising properties) that can be planted directly into the ground.

Website Instagram

Morgane Elza Loiseau

Morgane Elza Loiseau

The crafts of Morocco – the country of her birth - inspire Morgane’s designs – woodturning for the Chleuh chair and the Fouk & Taht table (meaning “up and down), and Berber weaving for its cushion, and for plant pots. Chair and table also embody copper plumbing, and the copper-lined Zellij light is in laser-cut wood.


Instagram

Clemence Grouin-Rigaux

Clemence Grouin-Rigaux

More than 60 billion animals are slaughtered globally - one billion in Britain alone. “It’s a constant and significant waste stream,” says Clemence, who has made her Hidden Beauty Collection of stools and small personal accessories from a resin/leather-like material she derives from slaughtered animal offal (blood, bones and skin).

Website Instagram

Annabelle Hulewicz

Annabelle Hulewicz

Annabelle is a mixed media artist who works with ceramic, textiles, recycled glass and found objects. Her hand-built Hollows are inspired by woodland tree roots, branches, wildflowers, moss and lichen; her Ruined Vessels by an abandoned farmhouse, and her ceramic tiles by a trip to Bali.

 

 



Website Instagram

Claire Varin

Claire Varin

After extensive medical and ergonomic research, Claire has prototyped in fibreglass a baby bath designed to reduce the effects of eczema by removing chlorine from the water with a filter of dried citrus slices. The shape will support babies from newborns up to one year, and is comfortable for mothers to use.

 

 


Instagram

Kamile Balciunaite

Kamile Balciunaite

Kamile has been inspired by minimalist architecture and the colour palette of the Bauhaus. She sketched and photographed numerous buildings in London and added abstract motifs to create an extensive collection. Working entirely by hand, she dyed different types of cloth, then patterned them with discharge and screen-printing, stencils, devoré (burnout), foil blocking and other techniques.

 


Instagram

Tijana Kostić

Tijana Kostić

Tijana Kostic, from Serbia, recently completed her MA in design at Central St Martin's. For her Subversion Collection of Transformable Furniture, she has modified standard but immensely strong industrial quick-grip clamps so that they can slide up and down to support table tops in glass or timber at any height and in any size or shape.                               





Website Instagram

Rachna Garodia

Rachna Garodia

Trained in textiles at the National Institute of Design in India, and then at the Royal School of Needlework, Rachna Garodia is skilled in weaving and embroidery, with a studio in West London. Her Landscape light-diffusing screen is woven from cotton, raffia, jute, linen, and sisal with wheat pods.


Website Instagram

Anne Gardner

Anne Gardner

Each one of Anne’s porcelain and stoneware bowls is handmade and individual. They are thrown on the wheel and may include handbuilding and slip-cast elements. Then they are handpainted with oxide pigments before glazing. “I’m using the clay as a canvas to explore abstract decoration.”


Website Instagram

Sponsors

Loading

Event Partners

Loading
  • BIID
  • Cedia
  • Clerkenwell design week
  • Design Guild Mark
  • Design j
  • Design London
  • Design Shanghai

Media Partners

Loading
  • darc
  • designboom
  • DeZeen
  • Hospitality Interiors
  • Interior Designer magazine is Britain's oldest magazine for professional interior designers and is firmly established as the premier source of inspiration for the interiors community. Published bi-mon ...
  • Living is the magazine for interiors, design and lifestyle from the Corriere della Sera newspaper. A monthly magazine, a digital edition, and a website dedicated to new ways of experiencing, household ...